Just Say “No” to Financial Institution Intrusion into the Financial Power of Attorney Arena

I increasingly get calls from clients who are concerned when they run into the following situation.

The financial institution where the client maintains an account tells her she must use only that financial institution’s power of attorney form, rather than her own power of attorney.

Furthermore, if the client stands firm on using her own power of attorney, some financial institutions will thereafter attempt to mandate that she (or the agent named in her power of attorney) sign an additional institutional form that operates as an overlay for the client’s own power of attorney.  This overlay form is captioned along the line of “ABC Bank Attorney-in-Fact Agreement and Affidavit for Non-ABC Bank Power of Attorney.” This form gives the misdirected impression the client can now freely use her own power of attorney, without the institutional power of attorney form.

The above ostensible “must” also sometimes includes the institution telling the client that its legal department will have to review the client’s own power of attorney. This often is where I get the phone call from my client.  And the word “must” generally never sits well with me in many situations.

So, just say “no” to the above institutional power of attorney forms. “No” to all of the forms. Stand strong with a persistent “no” and inform the institution you will use your own power of attorney, without signing any additional institutional forms dealing with the power of attorney.

So, why do I strongly recommend against these institutional forms (including the above overlay “agreement and affidavit for non-ABC Bank power of attorney”)? Because these forms in most cases include features that are targeted to benefit the financial institution, not you.

Among the key institutional form features are:

  1. The agent must agree to indemnify the financial institution against a broad range of items;

  2. The institution’s form mandates what specific state law controls, which might be a state other than the principal’s home state.  Or, a state other than where the agent lives, etc.;

  3. The form requires an agreement to arbitration for issues that arise with the power of attorney.

Also, back to the above legal department mandate. Don’t be alarmed if the financial institution runs your power of attorney by their legal department. Just give them a pdf or photocopy for that purpose. I have had these run-thru-the-legal department situations occur numerous times with no negative consequences. And, with my clients not thereafter signing any of the institution’s forms.

And, quite frankly, if I am an agent acting for my principal under a power of attorney and my principal, if incapacitated, cannot weigh in on these institutional form requests, I (as the agent) likely do not have authority to agree to the institution’s mandate without some preexisting agreement or discussion with my principal. This is likely a reason financial institutions are now pushing these power of attorney forms on their customers as early as possible.

In order to help give you the strength to say “no”, I recommend you make sure you have an updated, comprehensive power of attorney in place that you can point to when you push-back against these financial institutions.

Also, as an important aside, in Georgia the statutory provisions for having a power of attorney under O.C.G.A. Section 10-6-140 state expressly that the Georgia statutory form power of attorney is not the exclusive method of creating the agency.

Therefore, Georgia law acknowledges use of either a Georgia statutory form power of attorney or your own format of a power of attorney. I have not seen the above financial institution mandate tested fully against the backdrop of Georgia law, but my view is an institution will be hard-pressed to succeed with its own-forms mandate against the existence of these Georgia statutes.

Finally, the New York Times had a good piece last year (May 6, 2016) about this same power of attorney push-back from financial institutions. Click here for the link.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s