Estate Planning for Our Children

I plan over the next two weeks to get my teenage kids to sign basic Last Wills and Testament, financial powers of attorney, and health care directives. Georgia law allows a person age 14 or older to have a Will.

There are two reasons why consistently I had put off this task until now. One, and I admit a degree of nervousness as I type this sentence, is that we parents simply do not wish to contemplate or envision any possibility of our children dying or becoming incapacitated. Getting them to sign their own estate planning documents can feel like we are pushing our kids too fast, and too far along, the pathway of life (and ultimately toward death).

Two is that for many families the hourly law firm rates for estate planning make basic, core planning appear overpriced, and a task, therefore, for some other day. Also, frankly, I failed for many years up until now to take time during my busy work-load to develop and create a well-written basic Will. I simply never had a basic Will I offered to clients.

In view of my own family situation, I finally stopped and took time to design and prepare an excellent, basic Last Will and Testament. It will work perfectly for my kids, and will be effective until they later get married or accumulate assets that warrant revisiting their estate planning. Or, it will continue effectively in place even if my kids get married (but with no Will provisions for their spouses). The Will has a no-revocation provision in the event of marriage.

This basic-Will task also demonstrates that creating simplicity is not easy. I spent time designing, tinkering, and deciding on what elements are optimal for a fine, basic Will. I am pleased with the result.

This Will, among its various provisions, refers to tangible and non-tangible property, tax and expense apportionment; “electronic communications content” [internet access]; allows, in accord with Georgia law, the executor to name custodians for property under the Transfers to Minors Act if necessary; includes a “No-Contest” clause that imposes litigation fees and related costs on a contesting beneficiary who initiates an unwarranted dispute over the Will or the estate; an express acknowledgment that the individual signing the Will is not in a relationship with anyone that he or she considers is, or creates, a common law marriage in any state, as the date of execution of the Will, etc.

I also believe my kids will find their moment of signing these estate planning documents a positive, notable point of progression of their continuing maturity and developing adulthood.

I urge you to consider having your age 14 and over kids sign similar documents.  I provide these documents on a flat-fee basis.

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