Avoid Derailing Your Valuable Time; Trust Delegation

My recommendation for most decisions in life goes primarily to a time question.  How much time for enjoyment does a person have, and what toe-stubs, hurdles, problems, unanticipated issues, etc., cut against this available time for enjoying life?  This time-formula does not get into the question of how one finds enjoyment (e.g., work, family, vacation, sports, music, books, hobbies, etc.), but rather focuses on what potentially derails that available time.

The central point of this post is that I recently added two new provisions to my revocable living trust expressly giving the trustee the ability to delegate both (i) the administration of the trust to an “Administrative Trustee” and (ii) the investment management for a portion or all of the trust assets to an “Investment Manager”.

Administrative Trust duties include, for example, the powers:

” (a) To maintain bank accounts, brokerage accounts and other custody accounts for the custody and safekeeping of the trust property, receiving trust income, making disbursements in payment of trust expenditures and, as directed by the Trustee, making distributions to or for the benefit of the beneficiaries;

(b)   To maintain the storage of stock certificates or other evidence of ownership of the assets held as part of the trust property;

(c)    To maintain the books and records of each trust established under this trust agreement;

(d)   To maintain an office for meetings with the Trustee and for other trust business;

(e)   To originate, facilitate and review trust accountings, reports and other communications pertaining to the trusts under this trust agreement with any Trustee, Independent Trustee, Administrative Trustee, Investment Manager, beneficiary and unrelated third parties who have a reasonable need as to that information;

(f)    To respond to inquiries concerning the trusts established under this trust agreement from any Trustee, Independent Trustee, Administrative Trustee, Investment Manager, beneficiary and unrelated third parties;

(g)    To prepare and file (or arrange with the Trustee for preparation and filing of) income tax returns for the trust and any other reasonably necessary compliance or information returns;

(h)   To execute documents as to trust account transactions; and

(i)    To retain accountants, attorneys, agents and other advisors as to the performance of the Trustee’s duties.”

These new trust revisions are also in line with the evolving greater use around the country for directed and delegated trust planning. The Trustee can continue being the Trustee quarterback of the trust, with the benefit of others handling the administration and investment management. These trust revisions also are in line with what I perceive as an exponential growth over the past few years of the complexity and choice-options we face in virtually all facets of our lives.

My revisions mean that a trustee (for example, a surviving spouse) does not have to be burdened with the entire gamut of trustee responsibilities.  Rather, in this example, the surviving spouse can delegate the administrative duties of the trust and/or the investment management of the trust assets, if he or she so desires.

Also, by inclusion of these delegation provisions in the trust document, an administrative trustee and an investment manager, if and when they accept these positions – by operation of these new trust revisions – become subject to a fiduciary duty as to the trust. This further provides protection of the trust assets, etc.

In addition, the delegation of the Administrative Trustee can be useful if circumstances arise where the legal situs of the trust needs optimally to be in another state (for example, moving the trust from Georgia to Delaware). This situs-change can be for tax and non-tax reasons.  The delegation of investment management also can help avoid investment scams, Madoff situations, cold-call / penny stock sales pressure, or simply poor, undisciplined or lack-of-attention investment management and oversight.

Finally, I understand that one reading this post might react with: “These new provisions make trust planning too complicated, with even more planning options to consider, etc.  I just want something simple.” This is an understandable response. And, there is always the available effortless option of having merely a “simple” outright estate plan, or no plan.

But, my reply to the notion of a “simple plan” or “no plan” is that these options do not avoid or eliminate the universal element that we all may face at some point in our lives. That is, upon our incapacity or death, someone will inevitably have to step in and oversee our affairs and property, etc.  This is a zero-sum game.  The question for all of us is (or will become) when, who and how?

Does a client wish now – prior to incapacity or death – to design an estate plan that gives the client input and control over these “when, who and how” factors?  Or, does the client wait and let these decisions and responsibilities fall to someone else?

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