Your 18-Year Old is Off to College in the Fall. HIPAA Confidentiality.

This first paragraph is the essence of this post. One of my children is now 18 and an adult for HIPAA medical confidentiality and disclosure purposes. Without a HIPAA release, no educational institution, medical facility or other personnel of any type can disclose to me — even as a parent — information, including whether or not my child is a patient at any of the random medical facilities or hospitals I call. I could potentially be completely in the dark, and upended with worry if I were to run up against this HIPAA hurdle. Without the HIPAA release, my calling simply to ask any hospital if my child is a patient there will fall on deaf ears.

[There are some extremely limited exceptions to this HIPAA constraint, but as a practical matter we all should plan as though HIPAA applies to all health and medical information.]

Now, a more expanded discussion. My 18-year daughter leaves for out-of-state college in the fall. I will MISS her, but she — for which I am proud — is developing her own strong, competent, and independent wings. As part of her continuing pathway as an adult, I had my daughter recently sign core estate planning documents, including a basic Will, a financial power of attorney, and a health care directive. The health care directive was the primary impetus motivating me to get my daughter to sign these core documents.

In broader terms, I do not anticipate problems that will trigger having ro rely on these documents at my daughter’s youthful, healthy 18-year stage in life. But, I also am well aware of the vast, difficult hurdles and challenges I would face if something completely unanticipated were to occur and I did not have these documents. More specifically, the following HIPAA element was the tipping point as to my getting these documents in place for my daughter.

Let’s assume my daughter, at college 1,000 miles away, is admitted to a hospital due to illness or an accident (let’s hope these events never occur!). We don’t hear from her for a few days; her dorm roommates and other friends do not know her whereabouts; there have been no phone texts, no Instagram, etc.  Let’s also assume we eventually learn my daughter has food poisoning to the extent she had to be hospitalized. But, where is she? No one will tell us.

However, my daughter has now designated my wife and me as agents under her health care directive. We have express authority from her for otherwise HIPAA- protected medical information. We can find out where she is much more readily and effectively, if ever necessary.

If you think this HIPAA worry is merely theoretical, then let me know if you change your mind after finding yourself in one of these worrisome, seemingly interminable, stonewall confidentiality situations. You can read a very good November 2017 WSJ piece on this same subject with reference to more examples. Click here for the WSJ link.

At a minimum, I suggest parents get a health care directive (that includes the HIPAA release) for their college-bound daughter or son before college starts. The fun college parties, beginning with fall football, start soon.

I will be glad to prepare these core documents, or you also can contact me at (470) 401-0101 if you have any questions or need additional information.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s